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Full text of "Wayside Inn front door diaries"

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SOUTH SUDBURY 

R. F. D. 
MASSACHUSETTS 



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cordially invites you to attend 




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COMMENCEMENT 
EXERCISES 



Wednesday JVvening, July 2nd, 1930 
eignt-thirty P. JM. 



W ay side Inn 






PROGRAM 



processional- 
Excerpt from Pomp and Circumstance 

INVOCATION 

Rev. Edwin P. Booth 

AT EVENING TIME 



Elgar 



Steadman 



WELCOME 
SILENT RIVER 
CLASS WILL 
FORTUNA 
ADDRESS 



Glee Club 
David Sobel 

Quartette 
Leon Gooch 

Orchestra 



Daniel 



Zamecnik 



Mr. C. M. McConnell 

Boston University, School of Theology 

ON THE ROAD TO MANDALAY Oley Speaks 

Louis Seligman and Glee Club 

PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES 

Mr. E. J. Boyer 



AMERICA 



School and Guests 



(audience please rise) 



BENEDICTION (audience please rise) 

Rev. Edwin P. Booth 

RECESSIONAL — Triumphal March from Aida Verdi 

(audience will please remain standing during recessional) 



TO RECEIVE CERTIFICATES 



Francis Calvert 
Leon Gooch 



William Graham 
Hyman Seligman 
David Sobel 



DOUBLE QUARTETTE 



William Graham 
Michael Bolesky 
Francis Calvert 
Earl Stoddard 



Joseph Ochedowski 
Louis Seligman 
Michael Srodulski 
Hyman Seligman 



ORCHESTRA 



Violins 
Louis Seligman 

Hyman Seligman 

Michael Bolesky 

Earl Stoddard 

Banjo 
Francis Calvert 



Trumpets 
George Johnson 
Arthur Logue 

Drums 
Clarence Haskell 

Piano 
Joseph Ochedowski 



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pea 
excursions 



TO THE 



WAYSIDE INN 





FROM 

BOSTON and WORCESTER 

Hourly Service 

Round Trips or One Way 



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B &W RED SIAR 
COACH LINES 



^}iep back into theDagof (jolmiial Romance 




TheWayside Inn in South Sudbury , Mass . , is probably 
best known as the scene where Henry Wadsworth 
Longfellow wrote his "Tales of a Wayside Inn." 
Originally called the Red Horse Tavern, it was built in 
1686 by David Howe, as the poem says, "in the Old 
Colonial Day, When men lived in a grander way, With 
ampler hospitality." 

In 1923, Henry Ford purchased the Wayside Inn, stocking 
it with rare Colonial antiques, moving nearby the school- 
house visited by Mary's Little Lamb, and setting the old 
grist mill going. Today the Inn is exactly the way it was 
two centuries ago. 

In the coachhouse are several stagecoaches. A huge grand- 
father's clock, and the great open fireplace are features of 
the living room. In the dining room is a fine collection of 
pewter ware — plates, bowls, goblets, mugs, knives, forks, 
spoons, and similar utensils. The bar still stands in the 
taproom, with more pewter and silver mugs and tank- 
ards, while in the kitchen, besides pewter and stoneware, 
is a remarkable collection of woodenware — trenchers, 
bowls, butter molds, plates, knives, forks — and sundry 
other housekeeping utensils of Colonial days. 



Across the hallway are Washington's room, Long- 
fellow's room, and theEdison room. Fine specimens 
of old beds, pung and canopy type, with trundle 
beds beneath, are round upstairs. 

If you want to know how they really lived in those olden 
times — step across the threshold of the Wayside Inn, 
and you wiil find yourself back in the days 01 Colonial 
romance. 

THE INN EASILY REACHED 
VIA B. & W. MOTOR COACHES. 

The B. &W. Red Star Motor Coaches will take you direct 
to the Wayside Inn. Every day there is a round-trip ex- 
cursion bus that leaves Boston in the morning, gives you 
two hours at the Inn, then goes on to Worcester where 
you may see the sights or shop for two hours, and return 
to Boston in time for dinner. A similar excursion begins 
at Worcester, visits the Inn and Boston, and returns to 
Worcester. Or — take any hourly B. & W. Red Star bus on 
the Boston-Worcester run, stay at the Inn as long as you 
like, and return at your convenience. The schedules be- 
low give times and fares. 



SPECIAL ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS 

B OSTON -WORCESTER 

Spend 2 hours at WAYSIDE INN 

Have Luncheon There 
Then See the Sights or Shop in Boston or Worcester 




Round Trip 

Iv. Boston 10:30 a.m. 

ar. WAYSIDE INN 11:30 

Iv. WAYSIDE INN 1:30 p.m. 

ar. Worcester 2:30 

lv. Worcester 4:00 

ar. Boston 6:00 



lv. Worcester 10:00 a.m. 

ar. WAYSIDE INN 11:00 

lv. WAYSIDE INN 1:00 p.m. 

ar. Boston 2:00 

lv. Boston 4:30 

ar. Worcester 6:30 




Round Trip 



HOURLY SERVICE 

to and from 

THE WAYSIDE INN 

Stay at the Inn as long as yon want 
Return at your convenience 



Buses leave Boston hourly 
on half hour 
arrive WAYSIDE INN hourly 
on half hour 



Buses leave Worcester hourly 

on hour 
arrive WAYSIDE INN hourly 

on hour 



All Schedules and Rates sublet to change without notice 



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JULY THE FOURTH 

In tho6e gay nineties pittured now as 

dull and commonplace 
When women rode on bicycles and 

scorned a painted face; 
When what was proper seemed to be a- 

fetish with us all, 
Although I wa,^ a youngster then soma 

"thrills'' I can recall. 
We had our celebrations, east and vest, 

south and north 
The kids got up at 4 A. M. to start tha 

glorious Fourth. 

We'd plan that days for weeks and 

weeks. Black powder long we 

stored 
To load a rusty cannon which was 

nailed upon a board. 
The giant cracker held full sway, and 

strangely now I muse 
The deadlier the firework was, thi 

shorter was its fuse. 
We shattered sleep and eyes and arms 

and many a window pane 
Until reformers came along and made 

us safe and sane. 

And those were lucky who escaped th* 

glories of the day 
Who did not lose an arm or hand or 

blow an eye away 
For many a sturdy youngster who had 

lit a cracker stout 
Risked life and limb by picking up tha 

thing he thought gone out. 
In freedom's name were cannons fired 

and pistols wildly aimed 
And full a week it took to count the 

nation's dead and maimed. 

Those good old-fashioned days hav« 

gone. Perhaps 'tis better so. 
Perhaps 'tis better beards are things 

which men no longer grow. 
Perhaps these modern "thrills" they 

boast are truly safe and sane, 
But fight with folly as you will still" 

folly will remain 
And thinking of my boyhood days, as 

comes the Fourth again 
I'll say that it was fun to be a healthy 

youngster then. 

(Copynrht, 1»80) 



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N. J. Birthplace of Joyce Kilmer 

Dedicated as National Shrine 



[Special Dispatch 
NEW BRUNSWICK. N. J., July 4— 
The two-story frame building at 17 
Codwise avenue here, birthplace of 
Joyce Kilmer, the soldier poet, was 
dedicated today as a national shrine 
to his memory. Public exercises held 
under auspices of the local Joyce Kil- 
mer post 25 of the American Legion, 
took place this afternoon in front of 
the poet's birthplace and were attended 
by 700 citizens. 

Among the speakers was Mrs. Fred 
B. Kilmer of New Brunswick, the poet's 
mother, who said that dedication of 



to The Herald] 

her son's birthplace as a national shrine 
made her "the proudest woman in the 
world." She recited the p<3em "Trees," 
Joyce Kilmer's masterpiece. Mr. Kilmer, 
the poet's father, was also present. 

Brig -Gen. Harry J. Reilly of Wash- 
ington, D. C, who was commanding 
officer of the H9th Illinois field ar- 
tillery and of the 83d infantry brigade 
and under whom Joyce Kilmer served, 
characterized the ceremony as one "to 
honor a man who throughout all his 
life showed that higher than anything 
materialistic must be the things of the 
spirit." 






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West View of Hitchcocksville, now Riverton, Connecticut, Home of the Hitchcock Chair Factories 

Enlarged from an engraving by John Warner Barber in his Connecticut Historical Collections, published in New Haven, 1837, by 

Durrie and Peck and John Warner Barber. The Hitchcock factory appears at the extreme left. 

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! EXPLAINS FORD AIM 
| IN WAYSM SCHOOL 

iCompbell Addresses Farmers 
At County Picnic 



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q The aim of Henry Ford in his Way- 
f*» side trade school and Wayside store. 
f operated in connection with the Way- 
side Inn, Sudbury, were told by Mr. 
Ford's personal representative, D. H. 
Campbell, to more than 5000 who at- 
tended the ninth annual picnic of 
farmers of Middlesex county on the inn 
grounds yesterday. 

It is Mr. Ford's plan to have boys 
taught how to ineet and please people! 
as well as to learn a useful trade: in 
other words, to develop in the boys 
marketing ability as well as craftsman- 
ship." said Mr. Campbell, who ha.; 
charge of both the school and the store. 
The picnic, the third to be held at 
Wayside Inn, was under the auspice:; 
of the Middlesex county extension ser- 
vice, aided by the Middlesex county 
farm bureau. The program started with 
a band concert by the North Chelms- 
ford training school band in the morn- 
ing, followed by various sports for both 
adults and children. The speaking 
took place after the noon picnic lunch. 
The speakers, besides Mr. Campbell, 
included President Bacon of the State 
Senate: . Prof. George C. Farley of 
Massachusetts Agricultural College and 
leader of the 4-H clubs; Chairman Wal- 
ter C. Wardwell of the Middlesex 
county commissioners and a trustee of 
the county extension service, and Dr. 
Arthur W. Gilbert, state commissioner 
of agriculture. The latter presented 
Mr. Ford through Mr. Campbell with 
the first standard wayside stand sign, 
adopted by the state department as a 
guarantee that all goods sold on the 
stand were raised on nearby farms and 
not brought in from outside places. 

This sign will be placed on the way- 
side stand at Wayside Inn. the old-time 
store that stood so long in Sudbury 
Centre and was tore down and recon- 
structed by Mr. Ford. 

The entire program was under the 
supervision of Allister F. MacDougall. 
managing director of the Middlesex 
county extension service, aided by Ray 
mond Clapp of Waltham, manager 
the county farm bureau. 



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Middlesex County Extension Service — Middlesex County Farm Bureau 



NINTH 



Annual County Picnic 



A 




Thursday, July 17, 1930 Wayside Inn South Sudbury, Mass. 



Program 



9:45 a. m. Arrival and parking of Automobiles. 
10:00 a. m. — 12 noon Band Concert. 

10:30 a.m. Horseshoe Tournament — Singles — Championship for Men — Town-Team Championship. 

11:00 a.m. 4-H Boys' and Girls' Games. 

12:00 noon Picnic lunch. 

1:00 p.m. Band Concert. 

1:30 p. m. Speakers: 

Mr. N. I. Bowditch — Chairman — Pres. County Extension Service. 

Mr. D. H. Campbell — Welcome — Wayside Inn School for Boys. 

Mr. Gaspar A. Bacon — President Massachusetts Senate. 

Mr. A. W. Gilbert — Dept. of Agriculture. 

Prof. George C. Farley — Mass. Agricultural College. 

Mr. Walter C. Wardwell — Chairman, County Commissioners. 

2:00 p.m. — 3:30 p.m. Band Concert. 

2:15 p.m. Ball Game — Married Men vs. Single Men. 

2:15 p.m. 4-H Boys' and Girls' Competitive Sports. 

3:00 p.m. Tug-of-War. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Autos can be parked at an angle anywhere on the old road from the Country Store to the Wayside Inn School. 
Cars may be used to drive to the various points of interest. Headquarters will be in the Grove opposite the Country 
Store at the junction of the new and old State roads. Everyone must register and get a tag for free entrance to all 
points of interest. Boys from the Wayside Inn School will supply information and direction to all points of interest. 



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■*-»* 



THINQS TO SEE 

Corresponding 

Number on Map "As ancient is this hostelry 

1. WAYSIDE INN. As any h the W may be " 

The latch-string is out and the Wayside Inn is still a place of rest and refreshment for travellers. It was built so 
after King Philip's War. Washington and Lafayette dined here. Henry W. Longfellow made the Inn the setting f 
"Tales of a Wayside Inn". In the parlor may be seen the "Sombre Clock", the "Landlord's Coat-of-arms", "Pri # 
cess Mary's Pictured Face" — all mentioned by Longfellow in the "Tales". The old Bar-room, an eighteenth 'centui 
kitchen, the Parlor — five bed-rooms and two Ball-rooms are open for inspection. 
Coach House. 

A brown shingled, weather-beaten looking building. This was constructed in 1909 of old timber. It now houses tw 
old coaches. The Governor Eustis Coach, used by General Lafayette on his way to the laying of the Corner Stone c 
Bunker Hill Monument. The Bear Camp River Coach which was run between Ossipee and Union, New Hampshire. 
Old fashioned Garden. 

Enclosed by a brick wall, the old fashioned garden contains a great variety of old time flowers. At the end of th 
center path is a bust of the poet Longfellow. Several peculiar shaped stones, an Indian mortar and a mill stone — a 
add to the charm of the garden. Beyond the brick wall can be seen a large cut flower garden. 
The Barn. 

Here will be found an old stage coach used on the "run" between Marlboro and Worcester. Also the two-wheele 
chaise used by Deacon Howe, Landlord of the Inn, to carry the mail to and from the Post Office. Horses and oxe 
are kept in this barn. 

2. THE FARM. 

Dairy. 31 Head Devon Cattle, including 5 recently imported from England. 

Sheep Pasture. 76 Cheviots. Near Grist Mill. 

Goat Pasture. 42 Goats. On Dutton Road. 

Poultry Range. 1259 White Leghorn Chickens. Near Dairy Barn. 

Turkey Pen. 77 Turkey poults. Near Dairy- Barn. 

Piggery. 24 Hogs and Pigs — Berkshire stock. On Hagar Road. 

3. TRUCK GARDENS. For use at Inn and Store. 
Extensive Vegetable gardens. In rear of Inn — to the East. 
Three fields — Bantam Corn, Beets and Carrots, Celery Peakham Road. 
Pumpkin and squash. Dutton Road. 

Potato Patch — 3 acres Irish Cobler potatoes — 1 /> acre Green Mt. potatoes. In field in rear of Hagar place 
Japanese Millet and Fodder Corn. Hagar Road. 

4. ORCHARDS. 




10 acres of Peach Orchards. Mcintosh Red Apple Orchards. Quince Orchards — on Hagar Road. 

FRUIT CELLAR. 



Under ground storage plant, 115 ft. by 125 ft. with natural ventilating system. 

6. CANNING KITCHEN . 

Over 10,000 jars of fruit are preserved here each year. 

7. RESERVOIR. 

Small stream from Mt. Nobscot — damned by a concrete wall 400 ft. long, and 35 ft. high, To provide water for 
use at Inn and adjoining buildings. 

8. PICNIC GROUNDS . 

Field in rear of old Jones house. The Jones house is one of the oldest houses on Wayside Inn property, the 
original part having been built in 1676. During French and Indian Wars, its occupants were friendly to the Indians 
and consequently the house was not burned or destroyed. 

9. THE MARY LAMB SCHOOL. 

Mary Sawyer was the "Mary" in the famous poem of "Mary Had a Little Lamb" and this is the school she at- 
tended. The sciiool house was built on Redstone Hill in Sterling, Massachusetts in 1798 and was in use as a school 
for about 60 years. It was then used as a carriage shed and later as a garage. Moved to its present location and 
re-built in 1926. Sixteen pupils in the first four grades are in attendance during the school year. 

10. THE WAYSIDE INN SCHOOL FOR BOYS — the old Calvin Howe homestead. 

In March 1928, the Wayside Inn School for Boys was established. Thirty boys make this their home while hav- 
ing an academic education as well as learning various trades. The class-room, dormatories, living-rooms etc. are 
here. In back of the house are tennis courts, an athletic field — and an airplane — under process of construction by 
two of the boys. 

10. SCHOOL LABORATORY. 

This building contains equipment for use in teaching various mechanical trades. Of interest is a completely 
equipped plumbing shop — including special tools, two drill presses, a lathe, plaines and grinder — a full set of elec- 
tricians tools, carpenters tools, including wood turning lathes and benches — and down stairs is a small auto repair shop. 

11. THE GRIST MILL. 

Built of stones drawn from Wayside Inn land, the Grist Mill stands by the side of Hop Brook and grinds wheat 
and corn for use at the Inn, the farm and the market. The mill stones used for grinding are French Burr stones 
brought from the Battlefield regions of France. 

12. WAYSIDE MARKET . 

Moved from the cross-roads in Sudbury Center, the old General Store has been restored and is now in use as a 
Community Roadside Market. Its purpose is to provide a market for farm products and home industries and handi- 
crafts — direct from producer to consumer. The market is under the supervision of the Woman's National Farm and 
Garden Association. 




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SUPERINTENDENT FORD SCHOOLS 



DETROIT, U. S. A. 






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JOURNAL 



February, 1930 



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ostort 

(etebrcLtina ^Jler U/ercentencirif 

Sketches by CHARLES W. SIMPSON, R.C. A. 
Text by JOE TOYE 




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ATOP BEACON HILL, THE STATE HOUSE, OTHERWISE THE STATE 
CAPITOL OF MASSACHUSETTS, DOMINATES THE CITY. THIS IS THE 
CENTRAL AND ORIGINAL PORTION, WITH THE PILLARED PORTICOES 
AND IMPOSING DOME DESIGNED BY CHARLES BULFINCH IN 1795 










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Henry Ford. History has it 
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owns the pair They came to hirr, 
through a relative who for years 
frequented the tavern and \va; 
fortunate in having been given 
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which he admired so thoroughly. 



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Members of Nature Clmb Leave for Day Afield 

and Leader of Group, Left to Right — Professor George H. Barton. Miss Mildred S 
'er. Director of Club; Miss Madelene B. Sskwyer, Mrs. Eugene Hannon. Miss Anita 

Miss EstelUs B. Sargent 



the boys expressed himself, "A sunny 
day might be ideal for the 'ole swimming 
hole' but today was Just made for nature 
study, for the smaller animals in the 
woods are not so apt to be on the lookout 
for us and we shall have, a better op- 
portunity to spy on them if they do not 
expect us. Besides if it rains we are 
dressed for It and I think it's fun to be 
in the woods during a rafn." 

The trip was arranged by the staff of 
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first stop is at South Sudbury where the 
class will take to the trail in search of 



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jects that do not come under the daily 
observation of the youngsters, who range 
in age from ten to sixteen years. 

A visit is planned also to Henry Ford's 
Wayside Inn and the Sudburv Museum- 
where the children will study objects 
from the Far North, one of which is an 
Eskimo Kayak presented to the museum 
by Professor Barton. The class then 
proceeds to Lake Boone and the after- 
noon will be devoted to aquatic sports 
and the study of water plants. The group 
will return to the Children's Museum 
at 5 P. M. 



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MIDDLESEX COUNTY BULLETIN 

Published Monthly By The Middlesex County Extension Service 



VOL. XII., No. 7 



CONCORD, MASSACHUSETTS 



JULY, 1930 



COUNTY PICNIC TO BE 
ON THURSDAY, JULY 17 

Wayside Inn, Sudbury, Will Again 

Furnish Ideal Location for 

Middlesex Folk 



The county picnic for Middlesex far- 
mers and homemakers and boys and 
girls will be held Thursday, July 17. 
Wayside Inn, Sudbury, Mass., has again 
been made available through the gen- 
erosity of Mr. Henry Ford. The sur- 
roundings of Wayside Inn make it an 
ideal spot for a picnic of this kind. 
There are so many attractions that ap- 
peal to our people, along with the 
educational and historical features that 
cannot be found at any other place 
that everyone wants to return. An addi- 
tional attraction this year will be the 
operation of the Country Store. This 
store is being developed as a demon- 
stration of what a community can do 
in operating a roadside market. It will 
be available as a place for nearby farm- 
ers and homemakers to dispose of their 
products and also serve as an example 
of what other communities may do. The 
store should prove a big attraction for 
our picnic. 

The Grist Mill will be in operation 
this year, with the products on dis- 
play and made available through the 
Country Store. 

Headquarters for the picnic will be 
at the Old Jones Place directly op- 
posite the Country Store. The facili- 
ties of this place are even greater than 
those furnished at the Trade School 
U;st year. It has a large pine grove 
that will be restful at all times and of- 
fers an excellent opportunity as a cen- 
ter for the music and speaking pro- 
gram. There is also a large field im- 



mediately back of the building that will 
be used for the various sports. The 
barn will be entirely turned over for 
a nursery where parents may leave 
their small children throughout the 
day. 

Honorable, Gasper G. Bacon, President 
of the Massachusetts Senate, is to be on 
the program. President Bacon is a very 
able speaker and one everyone will want 
to hear. Director A. W. Gilbert, De- 
partment of Agriculture, and other 
speakers of prominence will be on the 
program. >. M- £•*»»» pV««l.. va.x.StU«»» 
Mr. Ford has again opened the doors 
oi Wayside Inn for all people attend- 
ing the picnic and this is a treat that 
everyone enjoys. Because of there be- 
ing so many attractions on the grounds 
of the Inn, many people did not have 
an opportunity last year to see every- 
thing. Come this year prepared to en- 
joy all the attractions and have a good 
time with neighbors from all parts of 
the county. A complete program will 
be found on the last page of the Bulle- 
tin. 

W 7 ith the hundreds of acres at Way- 
side Inn, it means that the thousands 
of people who attend can roam around 
v. ithout the inconvenience of having to 
mingle with a large crowd. Be sure 
and bring a basket lunch. Ice cream 
and tonic will be available on the 
grounds. 

Roadside Market 
An interesting demonstration is being 
developed with the Old Country Store 
at Henry Ford's property, Wayside Inn, 
Sudbury, Mass. This store was moved 
over from Sudbury Centre on to the 
main Boston — Worcester Road and has 
been given a beautiful setting well back 
from the line of traffic and will be 
operated as a roadside market. It is the 
conception of Mrs. Ford and the Nation- 
al Farm and Garden Association. It 
will serve as a demonstration of the 
operation of a community roadside 
market. 

Down stairs will be used for disposing 
of the various products produced at 
Wayside Inn farm, along with produce 
purchased from nearby farmers. Up- 
stairs will be de.voted to the sale of 
home products, such as hooked and wo- 
ven rugs, quilts, blankets, preserves 
and other products that may be made by 
our homemakers. 

With the backing of the National 
Farm and Garden Association, along 
with the location at Wayside Inn, this 
country store should furnish a wonder- 
ful opportunity to many of our farmers 
and homemakers who desire to sell their 
products in this way. The many attrac- 
tions offered from this location means 
that consumers will be attracted to the 
store in large numbers. It is surely an 
interesting demonstration and one in 
which many of our Middlesex farmers 
and homemakers should take part and 
observe with a great deal of interest. 



PROGRAM ARRANGED 

FOR COUNTY PICNIC 

Thursday, July 17, Will Be Gala Day 

For Middlesex County Farmers 

At Wayside Inn 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau in- 
vites its members to attend the Farm 
Bureau- Extension Service picnic at 
Henry Ford's again this year on Thurs- 
day, July 17th. Those who attended 
the picnic last year will remember the 
wonderful things to be seen at Henry 
Ford's Wayside Inn, at Sudbury. The 
wonderful old Inn with its historic 
background, antique furniture, and hos- 
pitable hosts, will not be forgotten by 
any one who visited the picnic last 
year. The orchards; the market gar- 
dens; the apple storage; the old mill; 
the Devon cattle; the little Red School- 
house where Mary and her lamb went 
to school; and the latest feature, Henry 
Ford's store and roadside stand, will 
be ready for inspection by all the vis- 
itors. 

There will be horse shoe pitching, 
ball games, and sports for every one, 
in addition to plenty of grassy and 
shady spots where old friends can 
gather and eat their lunch and talk 
of old times. 

A band will provide music, and a 
speaking program will bring the crowd 
together after the lunch hour. 

Set down the date now, Thursday, 
July 17th, and prepare to come and 
bring your neighbors and friends. There 
will be many people there, that you will 
be glad to see, and the old Inn and its 
surroundings are well worth a day of 
your time. 







THE WAYSIDE INN 

TOUR NO. 7 
The Wayside Inn 

A tour to the Wayside Inn may be made a feature 
in itself, or may be taken in conjunction with tours 
numbered 2 and 3. In either case, no visitor to Boston 
should fail to see this remarkable museum of early 
American life. Only one-half hour from Concord or a 
slightly longer drive from Boston, and situated within 
a few feet of the busiest highway in Massachusetts, 
this delightful place is almost completely hidden from 
the view of the passerby. Unless accompanied bv a 
guide, you will be sure to miss one of the outstanding 
points of interest in the New Erg'and States. 

Purchased only a few years ago by Mr. Henry 
Ford, the Wayside Inn, or as it was formerly the Red 
Horse, has become the Mecca annually of thousands 
who come to live again in spirit amidst the quaint 
characters that once frequented its halls. 

Made famous originally by Longfellow in his "Tales 
of a Wayside Inn" it has become even more so due to 
the generosity of Mr. Ford, who has expended over a 
million dollars on the house and grounds. Among the 
interesting things to be seen there are the stage 
coaches which were used in connection with various 
activities at the Inn, the Rose Garden, the prize oxen, 
the Old Mill, the vegetable cellar, and the old road 
which ran in front of the Inn and which has been moved 
three times to keep abreast of modern traffic. 

On the grounds you may drink from the old pump, 
and sit in the old fashioned seats in the Redstone 
Schoolhouse where Mary Sawyer of the poem "Mary 
Had a Little Lamb" attended school. There you may 
hear the story unfolded by a competent hostess, and 
see a portion of the wool of the lamb mentioned in the 

poem. One of the most delightful thrills to be ex- 
perienced anywhere is felt when you realize that the 
classic of your childhood days was not written about a 
mythical character, but that Mary Sawyer and the 
Lamb actually did exist and the very school which 
they attended, through the kindness of Mr. Ford, has 
been removed from its original location in Sterling, 
Mass., to grace the grounds about the Wayside Inn 
and to lend atmosphere to that lovely old reminder of 
a time "when men lived in a grander way." 



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VI. Some Bridal Customs 

The owner of the Lowestoft spoons 
likewise possessed the wedding chest pic- 
tured in Figure 6. The chest was still 
full of homespun linen sheets and rose 
blankets woven by the hand of the owner's 
grandmother while she was still a girl 
under sixteen years of age. When I ac- 
quired the chest, I acquired likewise 
the peel, or slice (Fig. 8), with which the 
grandmother had lifted her pies, pud- 
dings and bread from the brick oven of 
her home. This word peel comes from the 
French word pelle, meaning a shovel or 
scoop. According to old custom, the 
carrying of one of these domestic instru- 
ments to the new home of the prospective 
bride constituted a charm sure to bring 
good luck, for it meant an abundance of 
good things to eat — truly a straightfor- 
ward and obvious symbol. 



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Marie Antoinette s Exo)ieration 

The grandmother's name had been Lucy, and I was 
privileged to see her old slipware pie plates, with the 
words Lucy's Dish inscribed upon them in yellow slip, 
a process achieved bv dipping the little finger in clay 
pigment and writing as one would with a quill. 

Lucy had been trained bv her French mother to save all 
her oven cake, which I confess was an article of diet quite 
new to me. It appears, however, that, in some localities, 
after the hot coals had been drawn from 
the brick oven preliminary to baking, it was 
customary to cover the oven floor — some- 
times with leaves, sometimes with a kind 
| of dough carpet made of flour and water.* 
This foundation kept the baking clean. 
Perhaps, too, it supplied some needed 
moisture to the oven. In any case, when 
the baking was over, the flour and water 
carpet had become a dry biscuit-like sub- 
stance, similar to the water crackers of 
today. It was broken up and stored in large 
crocks. The poor and hungry who came to 
the housewife's door were likely to be re- 
galed with oven cake. Even if not appetiz- 
ing, such provender would, at least, post- 
pone starvation. So in old France, and in 
some parts of young New England, oven 
cake was kept to serve as a charitable dole. 
And it was to this oven cake, I am told, 
that the unfortunate Queen Marie Antoi- 
nette referred in her famous but invariably 
misinterpreted suggestion that, if the people 
lacked bread, they might at least have cake. 
Some generations of philanthropic com- 
mentators have cited this as illustrative of 
the frivolous Queen's ignorance and of her 
indifference to the hard lot of her subjects. 
Alas, poor lady, it is her maligners who have 
been ignorant of the fare of common folk; 
the Queen knew whereof she spoke! 



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\Fig. 8 — Peei. or Slice 

An oven utensil tor extracting the 
baking from a brick oven. 



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Fig. 4 — Thomas Goddard {/?6j-/SjS) 

Son of John Goddard. During his entire lifetime, a 
useful citizen of Newport, member of the Society 
of Friends, active in the local fire company, of which 
he became Captain; Health Officer of the port. A 
staunch Federalist, who cast his first Presidential 
vote for George Washington. 

From a photograph by courtesy of Thomas Goddard 's 
great-grandson, Theophilus T. Pitman 



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PAGEANT TO 

TELL HISTORY 

OF CITY 

Waltham Miss to Be Dancing 

Partner of Visitor at 

Tercentenary Fete 

Joseph Beasley Franklin, 63^ 
year-old English civic executive, 
who is the guest of Waltham, will 
trip the light fantastic tonight 
after viewing the river pageant 
and carnival, the Watch City's 
tercentenary observance. 

The distinguished visitor, who is 
a dancing master, among his other 
accomplishments, will dance at 
least once with a fair partner, 
whose identity has 
vealed. 

In preparation for 
activities, Franklin, 
the Urban Council 
Eng , which includes Waltham 
Cross, was resting today. 
ATTENDS COUNCIL MEETING. 

Last night he attended a meeting 
of the Waltham City Council and 
extended the greetings of his coun- 
cil, which controls the community 
from which the founders of the 
Watch City came. He was brought 
in by Mayor Patrick J. Duane and 
introduced by President Alexander 
R. Smith. 

Later he was a guest at the home 
of John C. Clair, chairman of the 
Waltham Tercentenary committee. 
Tomorrow he will be a guest of the 
Rotary Club, will inspect ihe plant 
of the Waltham Watch Co.. where 
he will have lunch, and in the af- 
ternoon will attend the playground 
pageant. 



not been re- 

the evening's 
chairman of 
of Cheshunt, 






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JOSEPH BEASLEY FRANK- 
LIN, English guest of honor 
at Waltham's Tercentenary 
river pageant tonight, is 
ready for the big doings on 
Charles river. He is chair- 
man of district urban coun- 
cil of Cheshunt, England, 
which includes Waltham 
Cross. (Staff photo.) 






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OLD INDIAN CORN MILL 

ON DISPLAY AT RUTLAND 




ONE OF RUTLAND'S TERCENTENARY EXHIBITS 



■■ 



The Pixe Furniture or Early New England. By Russell 
Hawes Kettell. Foreword by Edwin J. Hipkiss. Garden 
City, X. Y. Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc. Price $35. 

Early American pine furniture has the double merit of being 
attractive both from decorative and antiquarian standpoints. 
On the decorative side, it exerts an influence which seems a 
relief from the strained simplicity and formal elegance that 
we often find in these days. On the antiquarian side it forms 
a link with that past which we reverence and for which we are 
cultivating an ever-increasing interest. 

Mr. Russell Hawes Kettell has done a great service to all 
who are interested in early pine furniture in his present work, 
by describing and illustrating a large number of pieces of all 
sorts. Being an architect by profession, he has naturally 
stressed the construction of the furniture above all else, and he 
has done this with the laudable aim of helping amateur cabinet- 
makers to reproduce old pieces with that fidelity to ne, orna- 
ment and proportion which is often lamentably lack hg in com- 
mercial reproductions. 

He starts, of course, with definitions, and enumer ■ es the 
various sorts of pine, giving the habitat of each. Prcct'.ally all 
the New England furniture of this material was made from 
three varieties only: white, red and pitch, of which the first 
is soft and the latter two are hard. 

Then follows a short chapter on the technicalities of con- 
struction, the various kinds of joints and the terms which are 
familiar to carpenters but which ordinary folk know little about. 
Inasmuch as Mr. Kettell is addressing himself hopefully to the 
amateur carpenter in particular, this chapter is essential. It is 
essential also to anyone who takes his pine furniture really 
seriously. So is the chapter on hardware, which lists the types 
of hinges, pulls, escutcheons and so on, used in early cabinet 
work. There are included careful drawings of the carpentering 
processes and the types of hardware which explain the text and 
make its comprehension simple. 

Although all this sounds as though it might be exhaustive, 
yet it takes up comparatively few pages, for the most of the 
volume is given over to illustrations, with a running commentary 
on the facing pages. Herein, of course, lies the chief value of 
the book to collectors. 

Only by comparison with other pieces or the photographs of 
them can we arrive at a just appraisal of the worth of our own. 
It is safe to say that there were very few articles of pine house- 
hold furnishings made in Colonial New England that are not 
illustrated in Mr. Kettell's book, from the simplest wall box 
for candles up to a highboy made in the same careful and 
elaborate manner as if it had been maple or mahogany. 

C. M. S. 









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BIG FUND TO 
BUY FAMOUS 
HOMESTEAD 



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To Preserve Farm on 

Which Washington 

Lived as Boy 



RICHMOND, Va., June 16.— 
Through the Virginia committee of 
the George Washington Foundation, 
it is announced that approximately 
$50,000 has been raised for the work 
of purchasing and preserving the 
Washington homestead farm opposite 
Fredericksburg, where George Wash- 
ington passed his boyhood and'youth. 
Present plans are to dedipate it dur- 
ing 1932, the bi-centennial year. 



confer on the plans with members of 
the Virginia committee. 

Practicallv every dollar received has 
been contributed In the North, mem- 
bers of the Virginia committee stated. 
X movement is just getting under way 
to enlist the help of Virginians. 

Scene of Cherry Tree Incident 

It was to this farm George Washing- 
ton moved as a boy of six, and there he 
grew into voung manhood. It was the 
only property left to htm by his father, 
i His mother resided there for 37 years. , 
and his father and one sister died while | 
the family was resident there. It was 
sold In 1772. 

It was on this farm, according to 
Lewis Willis, playmate and first cousin 
of Washington, that Washington hacked 
his fathers cherry tree, broke the neck 
of his mothers favorite colt and tossed 
a Spanish dollar across the Rappahan- 
nock. 



NORTH RAISES FUND 

Definite plans for the dedication and 
date upon which it will be held will be 
left to the National Bicentennial Com- 
mission, which pians to include the 
ceremony in the official programme of 
rentennial. Colonel H. S. Kimber- 
f th<* commission, is expected In 
urteksburg in the next few days to 



OUR NEW ENGLAND VILLAGE 

Id Republican) 

Stcrrowton is a fitting name for the 
New England village on the grounds of 
the Eastern States exposition. Mrs. 
James J. Storrow of Boston has put into 
this unique monument to old New Eng- 
land a large amount of money and. 
what is more important, a purpose born 
of her interest in and knowledge of Ne^ 
England. It is entireh- possible that the 
activities at the New England village 
will constitute the most valuable and 
significant part of the tercentenary ob- 
servance in Massachusetts. 

It is a rather curious facl that Mrs, 
Storrow. by the use cf practically dere- 
lict buildings, has been able to accom- 
plish the double purpose which inspired! 
her to create the village, namely, to per- 
petuate forms of New England archi- 
tecture and to illustrate for all time 
how New Englanders lived and to show 
how the fine, dignified buildings of a 
former day can be modernized without 
being spoiled. 

Thus one finds in the village antique 
period furniture and also good repro- 
ductions, the colonial mansion equipped 
with modern electrical appliances, the 
blacksmith shop in opera tion as of old, 
the New England church that one still 
sees on many hill tops, and a great deal 
more to illustrate the old New England 
life. 

It is true that the village as a whole 
does not and could not give quit? the 
flavor of the rambling eld towns that 
are characteristic cf New England, A 
part of their charm is in their irregu- 
larity, whether scattered along the main 
street or about the common, no two pre- 
cisely alike but all somehow giving the 
same impression of peace and quiet and 
charm. 

But the eight buildings of Storrow- 
town which have bern brought together 
from here and there, all have their in- 
dividualities and r; anybody's 
study. The small fee thai Is fiarged 
for entrance to the village will not pay 
for its mail and the protection 
of the many valuable that have 
been loaned, but whatever deficiency 
fh e r° may be can be regarded as a con- 
tribution to the tercentenary observance, 
and a valuable contribution, too, 



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Greeting&JFrom Old 
island 






62 High Street, Marlborough, England 
29th July, 1930 
HON. AMADEE A. MARTEL, 
Mayor of Marlboro, Mass. 
Honorable Dear Sir, 

Your letter of the 10th inst., is deeply interesting and I am 
grateful for the opportunity of renewing felicitations to the 
Citizens of our adopted and namesake City. The reference in 
your letter to the disastrous fire of 1653 which overwhelmed 
this Town recalls the even worse trials of those living in its 
early history whicfi shows how sternly the hand of the Conquer- 
or was placed upon the people and. how affairs which affected 
the History of our Country were settled here. 

On behalf of the Burgesses of this Town I beg to offer the 
Citizens of Marlborough, Mass. our congratulations on the prog- 
ress made ouring the last decade and to wish the Mayor and 
Council ever continued success during the coming years. May 
your City ever command for the public service, men and women 
of true faith, great hearts and leady minds. 

In conclusion may I also wish you every success in the com- 
ing celebrations. 

Yours faithfully, 
FRED SIMONS, Mayor. 




George's Lane, Old Marlborough, England 



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'BIG PARADE' 
GIVES BOSTON 
GREATTBRILL 

Bombs Boom, Bells Ring, 

Bands Blare and People 

Clap and Cheer 

SPECTACLE BRINGS 
THOUSANDS TO CITY 

Marks Climax of Civic Ob« 
servance of Massachusetts' 
Tercentenary 
i^tf BOSTON WEEK* ^, . 

Boston's week of intensive cele- 
bration began gloriously yesterday. 
His Worship Reuben Salter. Mayor 
of old Boston in England, arrived in 
due course and was hospitably 
greeted by the Mayor of new Bos- 
ton. A delegation of the City Coun- 
cil of the English city was on hand. 
Leading officials of Canada, headed 
by Major-General Hugh Havelock 
MacLean, came to be our guests. The 
! gallant French airmen, Dieudonne 
j Coste and Maurice Bellonte, also 
came. 

The chief event, by daylight, yes- 
terday was the dedicating of the 
splendid new health unit in the West 
End, at which Mayor Salter, deco- 
rated personally by his confrere, 
Mayor Curley and Governor Allen 
were the leading lights. Then came 
one of the most interesting cere- 
monies of the week, the opening at 
City Hall of a package which had 
lain in vaults for 100 years, and con- 
taining the chief marshal's baton 
carried by Brigadier-General Wil- 
liam Sullivan in the parade of Sept. 
17. 1830, together with letters to his 
successor deposited at the same time. 
This baton, with the memories of a 
century clinging to it. will be carried 
by General Logan in Wednesday's 
parade. 

Last night's parade, with its many 
floats depicting historical and tradi- 
tional scenes, its illuminated features, 
its bands and its genera! air of an- 
tiquity made modern was one of the 
finest and most picturesque proces- 
sions the city has ever seen. No 
such lavish adornment of street pic- 
tures has been known here before. 
The French fliers, riding with the 
Mayor, at the head of the. line, right- 
ly attracted the attention of all. 

There need be no fear that Bos- 
ton will fail in the least degree to 
uphold her finest traditions in this 
week's celebration. When it is over 
i we shall know that we have given of 
our best. 



60,000 ATTEND | fr 
E XPOS ITION 

Governors' Day at Eastern 
States Fair at Springfield 

SPRINGFIELD, Sept. 16— Nearij 
Ri.nno persons attended tne Eastern 
States Exposition on Governors' and 
Children's Day today, the feature of 
which was a reception and luncheon of 
Governors of four other Eastern States. 
Governor Allen and officials of the ex- 
>n acted as hosts for the chief 
executives and representatives of the 
other States. 

Governor William Tudor Gardiner of 
Maine had a special honor paid to him 
when the 4 H club hoys and girls from 
Maine invited him to he the guest at a 
dinner rooked by them from materials. 

grown by them on Maine soil. Gover- ' 
nor Gardiner said It was one of the 
best meals he had eaten In years. 

Each of the Governors paid a friendly 
ca.ll to the New Hampshire State build- 
Ing which will be dedicated tomorrow. 
For the young the hlsh spot of the 
tiny was the award of the grand 
championship and other prires in the 
bob)/ beef ,oniest. BlbeTt Jenk? 
of Mr. and Mrs. l.ee Jenks. of Feeding 
Hills won the grand championship 
honors^ repeating a victory thnt he won 
at the exposition in 192*. 



we come to u. 
for McKenney. 



« 



*J?./+!± 



BRITISH SOCCER 
TEAM WINNER 



Worcestershire Tops Mor- 
gans in First of Series 



WORCESTER, Sept. IS— First blood 
went to the team from Worcestershire, 
England, when it beat the Morgan team 
2 to 1 here this afternoon* jn. the first 
game of the five game s'efies being 
played between the Worcester County 
Sportsmanship Brotherhood," and the 
Worcestershire Sports Fellowship of 
Worcestershire, Kngla nd. 

It was a splendid exhibition of soccer. 
and played just as it should he played. 
Action all the time, and not the slightest 



sign of rough play. 

Morgans were unlucky when they lost 
this game, because five times during 
the game Llllie was given five setups 
and failed every time. It was one of 
the worst displays Lillie has ever given 
although he scored the only goal the 
Morgan team made. 

Combination was not a big feature 
among the Britishers— it was lost sight 
of when several of their efforts at com- 
bination were promptly broken up by 
Reauch and Company. The first goal 
was scored 18 minutes after the start by 
a Morgan, and this was the only score 
at the ftiterval. 

With only four minutes left the visi- 
tors staged a nice rally and Tomklns 
banged the ball into the goal for the 
winning point. 

Worcestershire — Crowe, Fathers, Law- 
day, Morgan, Barnett, Williams. Wyers, 
Stanton, Tomkins, Knight and Jones. 

Morgans— Whittle, Cocking, Ferrie, 
Barratt, Fales, Reauch, Ainsworth, Pet- 
tigrew, Lillie, Watson and Dixon. 

Goals— Morgan, Lillie and Tomkins. 

Referee — T. Harrison. 

Linesmen — A. Bain and E. Lippett. 

Time — 45 minute^halvcs. 



^Meeting 



n 



of the 

Worcestershire Sports Fellowship 

Worcester, England 

and 

Worcester County Sportsmanship 
Brotherhood 

Worcester, Massachusetts 



Monday, September 26th 

8.30 a. m. Motor trip to Boston. 
12.30 p. m. Lunch as guests of the English Speaking Union at 

the Boston Athletic Club. 
Afternoon Visit to points of interest in Boston. 
7.30 p. m. Dinner at the Wayside Inn as guests of Mr. Henry 
Ford. 
Escort, Mr. Henry H. Chamberlin. 



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Replica of First Edison Phonograph 
Is Discovered in Museum in England 




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SdEcial 



rr.oM 



TnE Christian Science Monitor Bireao 



LONDON— An appeal by the Insti- 
tute of Physics for old apparatus used 
by inventors in making their discov- 
eries, which might be lying about un- 
heeded and forgotten, has brought to 
light a replica of Edison's first phono- 
graph. This interesting instrument be- 
longs now to a firm of gramophone 
dealers in Brighton, by whom it has 
been lent to the Science Museum in 
South Kensington. 

Until two years ago the phono- 
graph was in the possession of Henry 
Edmunds, a pioneer in electricity, tc 
whom it was given by Edison in 1880. 
He was on a visit to America in 1877, 



table on which was a strange looking 
instrument with a fly wheel and a 
long cylinder. He motioned them to be 
quiet, and when near the instrument 
with Edison turning the wheel, they 
heard a voice with a very nasal twang 
say, "Mary had a little lamb, its fleece 
was white as snow." 

Edison then told them that it was 
the first time he had put the indented 
tin-foil record into the machine. 

Mr. Edmunds was the first to an- 
nounce in England in The Times that 
he had actually heard a talking ma- 
chine. It was two years later, when 
on a second visit to America, chat 
Edison presented him with a duplicate 



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and while in New Jersey went with a j of his first phonograph as a memento 
friend to a shed where Edison was i of his having heard the first words 
working. As his friend opened the ; ever uttered by a machine. This in- 1 
door they saw Edison seated at a strument weighs 140 pounds. 









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' I KMBER 19. 1930 



Northern Lights 
Put Radio Sets 
Out of Business 

Aurora Borealis stretched tenuous 
fingers across the northern sky Sept. 
18 and plucked at the unseen wires 
of the wireless to such a degree that 
radio sets in New England gave off 
weird and unaccustomed sounds and 
the phenomenon of fading programs 
was most pronounced. These fingers 
of light, popularly referred to as the 
Northern Lights, likewise caused much 
craning of necks and speculation on 
the part of spectators as to why so 
many searchlights were apparently 
mobilizing in the north. 

Someone telephoned to Lieutenant- 
Commander Donald B. McMillan, 
arctic explorer, at Provincetown, ask- 
ing for enlightenment on the lights, 
and was told that although the dis- 
play was unusually bright for this 
time of year in this zone, it did not 



compare with the real thing. He said, 
however, that it usually preceded a 
spell of good weather. 

Telegraph companies operating in 
New England reported that, whereas 
the Northern Lights usually interfere 
with the operation of their wires, this 
latest display resulted in no interrup- 
tion in the flow of messages. 



An Open Fire, 

l^un^CC^^ f~ /o~ 2j 

Late in the evening r was passing 
through the room, which was lit only 
by the fire from the grate. I stopped 
to look at it in obedience to some 
olden impulse and found the littlest 
boy cuddled in a corner between a 
table and the wall, with his eyes fixed 
on the fire. He was evidently absorbed 
in watching it, and as I did not dis- 
turb him he presently began to ask 
me questions. In the course of the 
next few minutes he had searched me 
for all I knew about coal, plumbago, 
diamonds, charcoal and all other sub- 
stances of the carbon group. While 
talking with him I could remember 
sitting with my own father before an 
open fireplace and questioning him 
in the same way. As we sat together 
the boy and I, I felt as never before 
that there must be truth in the theory 
that civilization grew up around open 
fires. The first step of progress was 
when the savage learned to light a 
fire and keep it going. As time passed, 
they learned to build their fires in 
sheltered places, and even to build 
shelters to protect their fires, thus 
evolving the hut or house. All fam- 
ily councils naturally took place 
around the open fire. ... It seemed 
to be instinctively right for the little 
boy to ask questions and learn things 
while sitting ... by the glowing 
coals. That was the way his ancestors 
to even the remotest period had 
learned things.— Pejer McArxhuk, in 
•Areund Hoafe* 






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TRADE CHIEFS 
FROM JAPAN 

16 Island Business Men 
Guests of City Today 

fitsT -f-/f-t' 

As part of a good-will tour they are 
making of principal American cities and 
industrial centres, a party of 16 Japanese 
business men, executives and engineers j 
of concerns throughout the island em- 
pire, will arrive in Boston this morn- 
ing. They will be met at the Back Bay 
station by John T. .Scully, directi 
the City of Boston Commercial and In- 
dustrial Bureau, and Henry D. Kendall, 
prominent manufacturer, who will be 
their host while here. After breakfast 
at the Copley-Plaza the visitors will be 



taken to various Industrial plants la 
and near Boston. 

Tomorrow the group will lunch at the; 
Wayside Inn, view the city from the 
Custom House tower, and make an in- 
spection of Boston Harbor, its piers 
and drydocks, the navy yard and other 
- of Interest. The Japanese fre 
making their tour under the auspices 
of ili Taylor Society. 



OUR JAPANESE VISITORS 

P<*> zT~ ?- ■? a - 3 ° 

Boston Is* honored today, and will 

be for several days, by the visit of 
14 Japanese industrialists and engi- 
neers who have come to see what new 
things they can learn about our man- 
ufacturing methods and scientific 
business management. Judging from 
a group picture in yesterday after- 
noon's papers, they are a fine look- 
ing body of men, with keenly intel- 
lectual faces and manifestly eager to 
profit by what Boston and vicinity 
has to show them. 

We have several industries here 
that are incomparable, both in size 
and in the efficiency of their opera- 
tion. Besides we have a variety of 
output that will surprise our friends 
from Japan, as they would any 
American unacquainted with them. 
They will pay especial attention, it is 
announced, to industries kindred to 
those they represent in Japan, such 
as knitting, the making of confec- 
tionery, porcelain, shoes, and toilet 
articles. Bigger things, like rail- 
roads and bridges and milk plants, 
will interest them. All things will 
be grist to their mill, and they will 
examine everything with the thor- 
oughness for which the Japanese are 
famed. 

We feel that we can offer these 
gentlemen something in the way of 
entertainment as well as in the lines 
of business, and that their stay in i 
Boston will be both pleasant and I 
profitable. 



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But few factories remain in England where horse-hair cloths arc woven o* 

handlooms and dyed in many colors. The one at the village of Laven- 

. ham is shown above. Only horse tails are used. 



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to. Standard Time 



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That extra hour that 
the spring breezes last April, when 
daylight saving went into effect in 
Massachusetts, is to be recovered 
among the falling leaves of autumn, 
as the State returns to eastern stand- 
ard time at 2 a. m., Sept. 28. 

Theoretically in order to capture 
the elusive bit of time Invested in 
daylight, clocks should be stopped at 
2 o'clock Sunday morning, and, after 
the lapse of one hour, started again. 
But, since with the clocks stopped it 
may be found difficult to measure the 
passing hour, the more general way 
employed will be to turn the time- 
pieces back one hour, when one gets 
around to it. 



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FORD HALTS TRIP^O* V 
/^sr EXAMINE ANTIQUE 

PARIS, Sept. 11 (AP)-Hmrv For. Is 
passion for mechanics caused him to 
reach Paris after 8 o'clock tonight, sev- 
hours late on his automobile trip 
from Cherbourg, where he had landed ' 
this morning. 

The motor journey consumed practi- 
cally the entire day. Just Before reach- 
ing Rouen Mr. Ford was informed that 
a threshing machine 100 years old was 
still at work on an ancient farm in 
Normandy, 25 miles away. 

The automobile wizard Immediately 
decided that he must inspect the 
machine. He postponed luncheon 
ceeded to the village and examined the 
older mower for nearly two hours, ap- 
, pearing intensely interested. 



HENRY FORD PRAISES 
PASSION PLAY 

Deeply Moved by Sunday's 
performance ^^ 

OBERAMMERGAU, Ger, Sept » 
(A P.)— Henry Ford and Mrs Ford to- 
day expressed themselves in the high- 
est terms, of praise at the performance 
of the Passion Play, which they saw 
at Its presentation yesterday. Both 
were deeply moved by the exhibition. 

Accompanied by Anton Lang, for- 
merly impersonator of Christ, they 
strolled through the village, called on 
several of the chief actors, and pur- 
chased some of the wood carvings. 

Another celebrity attending the last 
performance of the play was the Mu- 
nich Papal nuncio, Mgr Vasallo dl Tor- 
r-grossa. A Passion Play committee 
.anded him an illustrated album of the 
play, with the request that he present 
;t to the Pope. 



«fA!ck — ' 5«pT 31 

FORD AT OBERAMMERGAU 

It's a long way from the factories at Dear- 
born, Mich., to the little town in the Bavarian 
Alps called Oberammergau. and Henry Ford, 
on his visit to the town on Sunday for the last 
performance of this year's Passion Play, must 
have appreciated the difference. The first 
presentation of the last days of Jesus's life was 
in 1634, a humble gesture of thankfulness on 
the part of the townsfolk who had escaped the 
fury of a terrible epidemic which was sweep- 
ing the countryside. Then this continent was 
a vague, distant land, populated by bands of 
roving Indians and a few Spanish, French and 
English settlers. 

But now, we are told by a dispatch, this 
famous American was received by Anton Lang 
and other leaders of the village and "followed 
by a throng of wide-eyed villagers, far more 
impressed than they could have been by royal- 
ty." For Oberammergau of today, and espe- 
cially during the months when the play is being 
given and it entertains thousands of visitors, 
is a modern little city. With automobiles and 
buses clogging its narrow streets, electric lights 
in its shops and houses, telephones and tele- 
graph instruments on every hand, and its own 
tiny "movie" theatre, Oberammergauans are 
well acquainted with the works of Ford, Edison 
and other American inventors and manufac- 
turers. The distance between Dearborn and 
Oberammergau is still large in some ways, but 
it has recently become very small in others. 



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WASHINGTON, Oct. 3 — The head of a large mid- western 
lecture bureau was in Washington today. He told of the efforts 
which he had made for many months past to persuade former 
President Coolidge to accept a lucrative contract for a lecture 
tour under this bureau's auspices. He had written several long 
letters to Northampton without response, but he exhibited the 
first and final acknowledgement which had finally arrived in the 
mail a few days ago. It was brief and to the point, penned in 
the familiar Coolidge handwriting. It said: 

"I do not choose to lecture." That was all and as the re- 
cipient commented, "That was enough." 



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Coo 1 ! fines Observe 25th Anniversary 



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Ex-President Calvin Coolidge, with his wife, Mrs. Grace Coolidge, to- 
, day observe the 25th anniversary of their marriage. This photo, taken 
in garden of their new home, "The Beeches," at Northampton, show 
them with their pet dogs. The Coolidges plan no special celebration ia 
honor of the event. -^ . 









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EX-PRESIDENT AND MRS. COOLIDGE AT WAYSIDE INN 

Photo shows the former Chief Executive and his wife as they paid a visit 
yesterday to the famous old inn in Sudbury. They are standing by the 

old pump. 



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COOLIDGES HAVE 
QUIET '25TH' DAY 

Northampton's Leading 

Citizens Are Coming to 
Legion Session 

NORTHAMPTON, Oct. 4 (UP)— For- 
mer President and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge 
were observing their silver wedding an- 
niversary today with characteristic sim- 
plicity. 

No plans for a formal celebration of 
the event had been made. It had been 
reported that the Coolidges' son, John, 
and his wife, the former Florence Trum- 
bull, might come here from New Haven 
to spend the day. but Herman C. Beaty, 
secretary to Coolidge, stated they were 
not expected. 

Sometime today Mr. and Mrs. Cool- 
idge were to start by automobile for 

(Continued on rage loir. Column 8) 



COOLIDGES HAVE 
QUIEFOT DAY 

Northampton's Leading 

Citizens Are Coming to 

Legion Session 

j Continued from First Pag? I 

Boston, where they will attend the na- 
tional convention of the American Le- 
gion next week. They may spend 
tonight at Henry Ford's historic Way- 
side Inn at South Sudburv, proceeding 
to Boston tomorrow aiternoon. 

In connection with today's anni- 
versary, the United Press obtained from 
the 1905 files of the Holyoke Daily 
Transcript that newspaper's account of 
the Coolidge weddine. 

Bearing the headline. "Northampton 
r married at Burlington. Vt.," the 
story read: 

"BURLINGTON, Vt.. Oct. 5— Calvin 
Coolidge, a Northampton lawyer, and 
Miss Grace Goodhue, daughter of A- I. 
Goodhue of Burlington, Vt., were mar- 
ried at the home of the bride yesterday. 
Rev. Edward Hungerford, a retired Con- 
lonal minister, performed the cer- 
emony. Miss Goodhue's father is a 
wealthy local manufacturer and is also 
United States steamboat inspector for 
the Burlington district. Miss Goodhue 
has been much in society since her 
debut three or four years ago. Dr. 
H. A. McCormick of Northampton was 
the only guest from out of town " 











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COOLIDGE FORCED TO SPEAK 




Former President Coolidge responding to ovation at legion convention and saying 
a few words before microphone. 




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MILITARY LEADERS OF U. S. AND FRANCE 




GEN JOHN J. PERSHING (LEFT) AND GEN GOURAUD OF FRANCE 





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Sarah Cooper Hewitt, 

— — Founder, of JV. Y. Museum 

Miss Sarah Cooper Hewitt, daughter ot 
the late Ahram S. Hewitt, mayor of New 
York in the '80's. and granddaughter of 
Peter Cooper, the philanthropist, is dead 
in New York, aged seventy-one years. 
Inheriting much of the ability of her 
father and grandfather. Miss Hewitt re- 
sembled them also in her Independence of 
action and judgment, her direct handling 
of problems and her sure grasp of af- 
fairs. 

Her lifework was the foundation and 
development of the Museum of Fine Arts 
at Cooper Union, which, with her sister, 
Eleanor Hewitt, who died in 1924, be- 
Eleanor, she established in 1897. 
queathed to Sarah Hewitt $2,200,000. To 
this museum Miss Hewitt devoted a 
large' part of her time and of her for- 
tune, searching the world for additions 
to its resources so that eventually It of- 
fered to students a magnificent assem- 
blage of furniture of every period and 
what has been pronounced the finest col- 
lection of textiles in existence. For this 
contribution to the arts the French Gov- 
ernment made Miss Hewitt an Officer 
d'Instruction and New York University 
awarded her the honorary degree of Doc- 
tor of Humane Letters. 

In August of this year Miss Hewitt 
presented to Henry Ford her collection of 
relics, many of them 300 years old, in- 
cluding eighteen carriages, one of which 
was used by President Lincoln and by 
President Roosevelt at his inauguration. 
Three carloads of these antiques were 
shipped to the Ford Museum at Dearborn, 
Mich. Others went to the "Wayside Inn at 
Sudbury. 






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Henry Ford's Huge Idea 

ONE of these days the Antiquarian hopes to meander 
through the museum which Henry Ford is planning 
for Dearborn, Michigan. Thus far it is not in being, but 
Mr. Ford is industriously gathering the objects which are 
to be housed in it, or rather them, for the plan contem- 
plates a number of buildings, and he has the nucleus of a 
collection which will be the most comprehensive of any 
yet attempted. As the Antiquarian understands the idea, 
it is to show the development of the implements used in 
every line of human endeavor which has aided the prog- 
ress of this country. 

The Antiquarian has seen this collection in the tem- 
porary quarters where it is now housed, and he is amazed 
at the extent of it and at the promise it gives of complete- 
ness. The assemblage of objects goes far beyond what 
any collector has hitherto attempted. Mr. Ford has 
bought lavishly, with the result that there are many 
duplicates, but in time the collection will be sorted out, 
and by a selective process the best examples will be chosen. 

This is in line, of course, with the true spirit of collect- 
ing, which always insists upon replacing something good 
with something better. The Antiquarian believes that 
when this series of museums is completed, it will not only 
be the largest collection of American objects, but that it 
will also be the best. 




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Color From Cumberland 
Cabins 

By Ernestine Perry 

T^ROM Cumberland Mountain cabins 
■*■ have come bits of creative beauty 
to the Roadside Market in the old 
country store, which has been moved 
to the Boston-Worcester Post Road, 
in Sudbury, Massachusetts, by Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Ford, and which is being 
sponsored by the Woman's National 
Farm and Garden Association. Hand- 
woven linens, lovely "old-timey" 
baskets, hand-made chairs, and color- 
ful coverlets made by the mountain 
women living near the Hindman Set- 
tlement School in the heart of the 
Cumberlands in Kentucky, blend with 
the Colonial atmosphere of the store 
of "Bill" Parmenter which was erected 
before the Revolutionary War. 

Sitting at their looms, many of 
which were brought in by their an- 
cestors, (the sturdy pioneers who 
pushed into the West over Daniel 
Boone's Great Wilderness Road) the 
mountain women weave linens and 
coverlets and blankets of rare beauty 
and design, — "Cat-track and Snail's- 
paw," "Pine Bloom," "Martha Wash- 
ington," and many other lovely old 
patterns that our great-grandmothers 
used to make. These patterns have 
been handed down from generation to 
generation. The young mountain girls 
know the secrets of the dye pots, and 
amazing secrets they are too. The 
bark of a tree brings a warm brown 
that never fades, and indigo and mad- 
der, herbs and flowers, each bring dif- 
ferent colors that "kindly mellow down 
better than the fotched-on ones from 
town." Along with the preparation of 
the wool, the weaving, designing and 
dyeing goes the creative effort that 
brings articles of beauty into the drab, 
lonely little cabin at the foot of the 
rolling hills. 

Down the creek rides "the basket 
woman" with the product of her labors 
tied all about her on her horse. The 
shapes and colors of the mountain- 
made baskets are lovely to see. "Aunt 
Cord" is one of the famous basket- 
makers, and she makes many of the 
baskets sold at the Roadside Market at 
Sudbury. 

Hand-made splint is woven into 
chair seats of hickory that are quaint 
and sturdy. All heights are found in 
mountain homes, from the low ones 
that look like children's chairs but 
have full-size seats, to high ones with 
rockers. The low ones are the coziest 




Top: A Cumberland woman carrying 
her has\ets to mar\et. Center: Articles 
from the Cumberland Mountains ex* 
hihited during the Eastern States Ex- 
position. Bottom: The wal\ toward the 
cabin where weaving is taught. 

things to draw up before an open fire 

and watch the flames sputter and flare. 

Uncle Solomon really started it all 



at Hindman when at the age of 80 he 
walked barefooted many miles over 
mountain trails and through creeks 
to ask those "quare women" to come 
to Troublesome and "give his grands 
and greats larnin." The women came 
and pitched their "cloth houses" on 
the mountain, and now Hindman Set- 
tlement School is entering its twenty- 
ninth year of service. Miss May Stone, 
one of the original founders is still ac- 
tively carrying on her work there, 
with the assistance of brilliant men 
and women from all parts of the coun- 
try. 

Tragedy stalks the mountain trails 
when hundreds of little children are 
turned away from the school each year 
for lack of space and funds, but Hind- 
man School mothers about a hundred 
children each year and takes more 
than 200 more into its schoolrooms 
each day. Some of these have walked 
or ridden many miles to get to their 
desks, but there they learn more than 
the three R's. They go back into their 
homes with knowledge that lights up 
their whole neighborhood, or they go 
on to college and later enter the pro- 
fessional or business world where they 
often become leaders. 

Bare existence is sometimes difficult 
in the mountains and when droughts 
or floods come and crops get "mighty 
timid" there are hard times ahead for 
mountain families. Then it is that 
the women depend upon their skill at 
their looms and the orders that come 
to them from people who appreciate 
the beauty and historic value of their 
handicraft. 

Weaving and basket-making of early 
days are fast disappearing in many sec- 
tions of our Southern Appalachian 
highlands, and it will be only a ques- 
tion of time before the arts of the dye- 
pot and loom will be forgotten by the 
newer generations unless interest is 
fanned by these mountain schools. 
They are the warp and woof of our 
pioneer period, and too precious to 
lose. 






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